Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe [2021 Review]

We reviewed every amp we could get our hands-on. Every time we heard a Peavey Bandit, we thought to ourselves, “Man, it sounds fantastic!” Well, the amp truly lives up to its legendary legacy, and in our opinion, it is still the finest SS amp ever produced.

Its characteristics are the reason it has withstood the test of time. It’s a 1×12 combination, but it’s a large cab, so it sounds massive. The weight is also quite excellent; some have claimed that it is too heavy, but it is fairly portable for its size.

There are many more features that this amazing amp has to offer. If you are interested in this model, keep reading our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review for more information below.

Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe

The Peavey Bandit is still available today, and it is a fantastic small amp. Peavey’s TransTube distortion is, in our opinion, one of the greatest solid-state distortions on the market. This amp is an excellent alternative if you want a low-cost, dependable amp with excellent high-gain capabilities.

Weight

A lot of people are surprised by how hefty the Peavey bandit 112 amplifier is. It practically doesn’t matter which version you have if you have a very hefty amplifier. The reason for the weight is because Peavey places a high-quality speaker at the back of the majority of their amplifiers.

What tends to let many solid-state amplifiers down is the fact that the speakers that are generally installed in them are subpar. This is a real pity because there are so many excellent solid-state amplifiers available that most people believe they’re all awful.

Build and Looks

The brushed metal strips and black cowling on the speaker panel are firmly attached and rattle-free. The cabinet is made of high-density particleboard, with a 3/8″ pine plywood baffle and hefty metal corner guards according to our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review.

The broad, top-mounted handle has a somewhat spongy feel, making it particularly grip-friendly; the Bandit 112 is well-balanced and comfortable to carry at little over 40 lbs. Its interior structure appears to be of high quality as well.

With no silicone adhesive, the circuit boards and transformer are firmly secured to a folding steel chassis. Power and speaker cables are thick, and anything that isn’t part of a ribbon connection is either short or tightly wrapped.

Sound

The clean channel of the Bandit is precisely what one would expect from a good contemporary transistor amp, being well-balanced and fairly neutral, enabling the instrument’s uniqueness to shine through.

We’d recommend going elsewhere if you want your cleans with a hint of valve-like grit. The digital reverb is quite realistic, and it closely resembles an analog spring-loaded circuit.

The main issue is that decorating your clean sound with too much reverb might result in a grainy, unfocused lead sound when switching channels.

The pre-gain control and classic/modern/high gain switching provide skillful sounds for gritty blues, classic rock, eighties hard rock, alt-rock, current metal, and a variety of other genres.

While none of these sounds are definitive, there is plenty of diversity for budding guitarists to develop their voices according to our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review.

The Peavey Bandit 112 is an excellent amplifier, and the included speakers are rather good. If you are a gigging musician, the speaker upgrade might provide you with significantly better tones.

Who can use Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe?

We definitely suggest the contemporary Peavey Bandit for guitar players on a tight budget who require a dependable amp, especially metal guitarists. The contemporary Bandit keeps many of the characteristics of their more historical model, but there are significant differences as well.

The channel voicings varied somewhat, with Vintage, Classic, and Warm options on the Clean channel and Classic, Modern, and High Gain options on the Lead channel according to our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review.

There is still some amazing reverb, but no Presence adjustment. The T.Dynamics knob has been replaced by a power level switch on the rear of the amp, which allows you to select between 100%, 50%, and 25% power output. To be honest, that’s probably a better method to manage low-power settings.

And, of course, today’s Bandits are made elsewhere rather than developed and manufactured in the United States. We have conflicting feelings about it according to our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review.

Peavey amps were so well-made in America that it seemed like you could strike a railroad spike with one and it wouldn’t skip a beat. We kind of miss it, but Peavey gear is still excellent.

Which genre should you use Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe for?

The front controls for three voicings per channel provide a great deal of versatility, and the rear controls for volume attenuation and power amp performance make this a lethal amp.

This may be used for almost any style or genre, but it shines at Hard Rock / Metal. It accepts pedals with ease and is no louder than any tube amp on the market according to our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review.

It does not mean that Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe serves only a few genres, though. You can use this amazing amp for any kind of music.

Conclusion: Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe [2021 Review]

By far the greatest of the contemporary bandit range is the Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe. Peavey nailed it in terms of tone with this edition of the amplifier. It’s big and noisy, but it also sounds fantastic according to our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review.

Many of the newer Bandits we’ve heard don’t sound quite as nice. It wasn’t even near, having had both the current version and the red stripe amplifier. We hope you liked our Peavey Bandit 112 Red Stripe review and it was helpful.